Accounting vocabulary in English (P2) – Những từ vựng tiếng Anh quan trọng về Kế toán (P2)

Here are a few more accounting terms that you might find helpful:

  • Accumulated amortization: The total amount of amortization that has been recorded for an intangible asset over its useful life.
  • Amortization schedule: A table showing the amount of amortization to be recognized each period for an intangible asset.
  • Book value: The value of an asset as shown on a company’s balance sheet, calculated by subtracting accumulated depreciation from the asset’s cost.
  • Capital budget: A plan for a company’s long-term investments, including the expected costs, benefits, and risks of each investment.
  • Capital expenditure budget: A budget that specifies the amount of money a company plans to spend on long-term assets in the coming year.
  • Cash budget: A budget that specifies the amount of cash a company expects to receive and spend in the coming year.
  • Current ratio: A measure of a company’s ability to pay its short-term debts, calculated by dividing its current assets by its current liabilities.
  • Depletion schedule: A table showing the amount of depletion to be recognized each period for a natural resource.
  • Financial plan: A long-term plan for a company’s financial management, including its capital budget, cash budget, and other financial projections.
  • Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities: The net amount of cash generated or used by a company’s investing activities, as reported on the cash flow statement.
  • Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities: The net amount of cash generated or used by a company’s financing activities, as reported on the cash flow statement.
  • Net cash provided by (used in) operating, investing, and financing activities: The net amount of cash generated or used by a company’s ongoing business operations, investing activities, and financing activities, as reported on the cash flow statement.
  • Receivables turnover ratio: A measure of a company’s efficiency in collecting its accounts receivable, calculated by dividing its net credit sales by its average accounts receivable.
  • Return on assets (ROA): A measure of a company’s profitability, calculated by dividing its net income by its total assets.
  • Return on equity (ROE): A measure of a company’s profitability, calculated by dividing its net income by its shareholders’ equity.
  • Statement of cash flows: A financial statement that shows the sources and uses of a company’s cash during a specific period of time.
  • Tax rate: The percentage of a company’s income that it must pay in taxes.
  • Total assets: The sum of a company’s current assets and long-term assets, as shown on its balance sheet.
  • Total liabilities: The sum of a company’s current liabilities and long-term liabilities, as shown on its balance sheet.
  • Balance sheet equation: The accounting equation that states that a company’s assets must equal the sum of its liabilities and equity, expressed as Assets = Liabilities + Equity.
  • Capital structure: The mix of a company’s long-term debt and equity, used to finance its operations and investments.
  • Cost of goods sold (COGS): The direct costs associated with producing the goods or services that a company sells, such as materials and labor.
  • Current ratio: A measure of a company’s short-term liquidity, calculated by dividing its current assets by its current liabilities.
  • Depreciation schedule: A table showing the amount of depreciation to be recognized each period for a long-term asset.
  • Dividend payout ratio: The percentage of a company’s net income that is distributed to shareholders as dividends.
  • Earnings per share (EPS): The amount of a company’s net income that is attributable to each share of common stock, calculated by dividing its net income by the number of shares outstanding.
  • Financial leverage ratio: A measure of a company’s financial risk, calculated by dividing its total liabilities by its total assets.
  • Gross profit: The difference between a company’s net sales and its cost of goods sold.
  • Income statement: A financial statement that shows a company’s revenues, expenses, and net income (or net loss) for a specific period of time.
  • Net income: The amount of a company’s profits after all expenses, taxes, and other charges have been deducted from its revenues.
  • Net loss: The amount of a company’s losses after all expenses, taxes, and other charges have been deducted from its revenues.
  • Net working capital: The difference between a company’s current assets and current liabilities, calculated as Current Assets – Current Liabilities.
  • Operating expense: The costs of running a business, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.
  • Operating income: The amount of a company’s income that is generated by its ongoing business operations, before taxes and other non-operating income or expenses are considered.
  • Owners’ equity: The portion of a company’s assets that is owned by its shareholders, calculated as Total Assets – Total Liabilities.
  • Quick ratio: A measure of a company’s short-term liquidity, calculated by dividing its quick assets by its current liabilities.
  • Quick assets: The portion of a company’s current assets that are easily convertible to cash, such as cash, accounts receivable, and short-term investments.
  • Revenue recognition principle: The accounting principle that states that revenue should be recognized when it is earned, rather than when it is received.
  • Solvency ratio: A measure of a company’s ability to meet its long-term financial obligations, calculated by dividing its total assets by its total liabilities.
  • Sinking fund: A fund set aside by a company to repay its long-term debt when it comes due.
  • Time value of money: The concept that money has a different value at different points in time, due to the potential for it to earn interest or be invested.
  • Working capital: The amount of a company’s current assets minus its current liabilities, calculated as Current Assets – Current Liabilities.

I hope this additional information helps you better understand some of the key concepts and terms used in accounting. As you can see, there is a lot to learn in this field, but having a strong foundation in the basic principles and vocabulary can be very helpful in understanding financial statements and other accounting documents.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *