Human resource vocabulary in English – Từ vựng tiếng Anh quan trọng trong Nhân sự (HR)

In English, the term “human resources” (or HR) refers to the department or function within an organization that is responsible for managing the people who work there. This can include hiring and training new employees, managing employee relations and benefits, and ensuring that the organization complies with labor laws and regulations. Some common words and phrases that are used in the context of human resources include:

  • Hiring: the process of selecting and recruiting new employees for an organization.
  • Training: the process of teaching new skills or knowledge to employees.
  • Employee relations: the policies and practices that are in place to support and maintain positive relationships between employees and the organization.
  • Benefits: the perks and incentives that an organization provides to its employees, such as health insurance, retirement plans, and paid time off.
  • Labor laws: the laws and regulations that govern the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers.
  • Employee engagement: the level of commitment, involvement, and enthusiasm that employees have for their work and the organization.
  • Employee development: the process of providing employees with the skills, knowledge, and experiences that they need to improve their performance and advance their careers.
  • Performance management: the process of evaluating and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of an organization or its employees.
  • Talent management: the process of attracting, developing, and retaining the best employees for an organization.
  • Job satisfaction: the level of contentment and fulfillment that an employee feels in their job.
  • Employee motivation: the factors that drive and inspire employees to do their best work.
  • Diversity and inclusion: the practice of promoting and valuing the differences among people, including differences in race, gender, age, religion, ability, and sexual orientation.
  • Workplace culture: the shared values, beliefs, and practices that characterize an organization and influence the behavior of its employees.
  • Compensation: the financial rewards that an organization provides to its employees, including salaries, bonuses, and other incentives.
  • Employee handbook: a document that outlines an organization’s policies, procedures, and expectations for its employees.
  • Employee turnover: the rate at which employees leave an organization and are replaced by new hires.
  • Recruitment: the process of attracting and identifying potential candidates for open positions within an organization.
  • Succession planning: the process of identifying and developing new leaders within an organization to ensure its continued success.
  • Workplace diversity: the representation of different groups of people within an organization, including differences in race, gender, age, religion, ability, and sexual orientation.
  • Employee benefits: the perks and incentives that an organization provides to its employees, such as health insurance, retirement plans, and paid time off.
  • Employee engagement survey: a survey or questionnaire that is used to assess the level of commitment, involvement, and enthusiasm that employees have for their work and the organization.
  • Employee recognition: the practice of acknowledging and rewarding employees for their contributions, achievements, and good performance.
  • Employee retention: the strategies and practices that are used to keep good employees within an organization and prevent them from leaving.
  • Job description: a document that outlines the duties, responsibilities, and requirements of a specific job within an organization.
  • Onboarding: the process of introducing and integrating new employees into an organization and its culture.
  • Employee survey: a survey or questionnaire that is used to gather feedback from employees about their experiences, opinions, and preferences.
  • Work-life balance: the practice of managing and prioritizing the different aspects of an employee’s life, including their work, personal, and family responsibilities.
  • Employee relations manager: a person who is responsible for managing the policies and practices that support and maintain positive relationships between employees and the organization.
  • Human resources manager: a person who is responsible for overseeing the HR function within an organization, including hiring, training, and employee relations.
  • Talent acquisition: the process of identifying, attracting, and recruiting the best talent for an organization.
  • Career development: the process of helping employees advance and grow in their careers, including providing training, mentoring, and opportunities for advancement.
  • Employee satisfaction survey: a survey or questionnaire that is used to assess how happy and satisfied employees are with their jobs, the organization, and its policies and practices.
  • Employee wellness program: a program that is designed to promote the physical, mental, and emotional health of employees, including offering health screenings, fitness classes, and stress-management workshops.
  • Workplace safety: the policies and practices that are put in place to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses in the workplace.

Insurance is a financial product that provides protection against loss or damage. When an individual or organization purchases insurance, they pay a premium to the insurance company, and in return, the company agrees to provide financial compensation in the event of a covered loss. Insurance can protect against a wide range of risks, including damage to property, liability for accidents or injuries, loss of income due to illness or injury, and other potential losses.

Some common types of insurance include:

  • Property insurance: covers damage or loss to an individual’s or organization’s physical property, such as a home or vehicle.
  • Liability insurance: protects against claims or lawsuits arising from accidents or injuries that are caused by the insured party.
  • Health insurance: covers the cost of medical care, including hospital stays, doctor’s visits, and other medical expenses.
  • Life insurance: provides a financial benefit to the insured person’s designated beneficiaries in the event of the person’s death.
  • Disability insurance: provides a replacement for lost income due to illness or injury that prevents the insured person from working.

In addition to these types of insurance, there are many other specialized forms of insurance that are available to protect against specific risks. These can include insurance for businesses, insurance for specific industries or activities, and insurance for individuals with unique needs or circumstances.

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